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War Memorials

LEONARD COOK OF CULLOMPTON - DCM, MM and BAR

 

Soldiers in the 1914 - 1918 war were eligible for the following awards:

1. FOR GALLANTRY on the battlefield:

The Victoria Cross - for supreme acts of bravery regardless of rank

The Distinguished Conduct Medal or DCM -  awarded to Warrant Officers, NCOs and Other Ranks.

The Military Cross or MC  - awarded to officers below the rank of Captain and some Warrant Officers

The Military Medal or MM - awarded to Warrant Officers, NCOs, Other Ranks and women)

2. FOR GALLANTRY  and/or SERVICE:

The Distinguished Service Order or DSO awarded to officers above the rank of Major.

3. FOR SERVICE and/or GALLANTRY off the battlefield

The Meritorious Service Medal or MSM

4. MENTION IN DESPATCHES

No medal was awarded but a certificate was issued plus an oak leaf emblem which was worn on the ribbon of the Victory Medal.

Subsequent awards of the same medal are referred to as BARS because the recipient is issued with a small metal bar to wear on the ribbon of the original medal.

 

The award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal to 48551 Sergeant Major Leonard Cook MM and Bar, of "H" Battery, the 7th Brigade, the Royal Horse Artillery, was gazetted 3 June 1919 and his citation for this award was published 15 March 1920. He was aged 31 at the time. Only a handful of Military Medal citations have survived.

Leonard Cook was the son of William Cook, a carrier, and his wife Sophia, of Crow Green, Cullompton. He was born in Cullompton in the December Quarter of 1889. He was gazetted for  the Military Medal 9 November 1916 and for the Bar to the Military Medal 8 December 1916.

He survived the war and in 1922 married Florence Rutley.

 

From The London Gazette

15 March 1920

"For gallantry and devotion to duty since July 1917. His exceptional coolness and resource in action were most noticeable at Brie on 23rd March 1918, and his exemplary smartness at all time during the whole period have been equally conspicuous. It has been greatly due to his tact and energy that his battery commander has maintained a very high standard of efficiency."

 

 
 
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